Jan
28-31
All




March
17-20
All





April
16-17
Dpi,
GTLM
GTD



April
23-25
Dpi,
LMP2
GTLM
GTD


May
14-16
DPi,
LMP3,
GTD



TBA
DPi,
LMP2,
GTD




June
24-27
DPi
GTLM
GTD



July
2-4
All






July
16-17
GTLM,
GTD




August
6-8
All






August
20-22
GTLM,
GTD





October
6-9
All
Related Links:
WeatherTech SportsCar Championship
2021 Schedule & Winners
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(all times ET)
Date/
Class
Location/
Name/
Length
Winning Drivers
Winning Team / Car
Televised
Daytona
The Rolex 24 Hours





Sebring
Mobil 1 Twelve Hours
of Sebring





Long Beach CA
Acura GP of Long
Beach
100 minutes




WeatherTech Raceway
Laguna Seca

2 hours, 40 minutes




Mid-Ohio

2 hour 40 minutes





Raceway at Belle Isle







Watkins Glen
Sahlen's Six Hours of
The Glen





Canadian TIre
Motorsport Park

2 hours 40 minutes





Lime Rock Park

2 hours 40 minutes





Road America

2 hours 40 minutes






Virginia Int'l Raceway
Michelin GT Challenge
2 hours 40 minutes






Road Atlanta
Motul Petit Le Mans
10 Hours
THE CLASSES:
Daytona Prototype International (DPi)
Le Mans Prototype 2 (LMP2)
Le Mans Prototype 3 (LMP3)
GT Le Mans (GTLM)
GT Daytona (GTD)
Class
2021 IMSA SPORT CAR SCHEDULE
WeatherTech Championship Expands to Five Classes

There will be even more action for WeatherTech Championship fans to follow in 2021 as the Daytona Prototype international (DPi),
Le Mans Prototype 2 (LMP2), GT Le Mans (GTLM) and GT Daytona (GTD) classes will be joined by a new class – Le Mans Prototype 3
(LMP3) – at selected events.

A new generation of LMP3 models will be introduced to IMSA competition in 2021-2022 from four approved constructors –
Ligier, Duqueine Engineering, Ginetta and Adess – using 455 horsepower, Nissan VK56 engines. New LMP3 cars or earlier models
that have been updated to the new Evo will be eligible for WeatherTech Championship LMP3 competition.

Both the LMP2 and LMP3 classes will compete for points in six 2021 WeatherTech Championship races.
The Rolex 24 At Daytona serves as a stand-alone event that only counts toward the IMSA Michelin Endurance Cup for LMP2 and LMP3.

Driver combinations in LMP2 include a mandatory Bronze-rated driver – consistent with 2020 regulations – but now permit a maximum
of one Platinum-rated driver for all races. The Bronze-rated LMP2 class champion will earn the Jim Trueman Award and an invitation to
participate in the 2022 Le Mans 24 Hours.

Two options for LMP3 driver combinations are currently under consideration. One option includes a minimum of one Bronze-rated Am
driver and one Pro driver rated Silver or Gold. The other option includes an Am driver that is either Bronze-rated or a Silver driver under
the age of 25 during the 2021 season, as well as a Pro driver that is either Gold rated or Silver over the age of 25 on the day of their first
2021 WeatherTech Championship event.

Platinum-rated drivers are prohibited in the LMP3 class.

New Championship Points Structure Introduced

IMSA will adopt a new championship points structure for the WeatherTech Championship, IMSA Michelin Pilot Challenge and IMSA
Prototype Challenge for all race events.

Points will be 10 times what they were in previous years, with a win now worth 350 points, 320 for second, 300 for third, etc. Points will
continue to be awarded to 30th place in each class.

In addition, the WeatherTech Championship will begin awarding points for qualifying at 10 percent of the 2021 points structure.
A pole will be worth 35 points, with 32 points for a second-place qualifier, 30 for third, etc. down to 30th place in each class

Points from qualifying will be awarded for all drivers in each car in addition to each team. Each manufacturer’s highest-qualifying car
also will earn points toward the manufacturers’ championship.

"The introduction of qualifying points will bring even more excitement to our event weekends and the season championship," said
Doonan. "With points on the line, we expect teams will go all out in qualifying as well as the races to earn as many points as possible.
Qualifying points also will reward a team’s performance throughout an entire weekend."

New Qualifying Format for LMP2, LMP3 and GTD

Qualifying sessions for WeatherTech Championship LMP2, LMP3 and GTD classes will be broken into two segments and split
between two drivers. The first segment will see Am drivers on new sets of tires in each car to set its starting position.

At the end of the Am segment, there will be a mandatory driver and tire change. The driver in the second segment will qualify for
championship points, also using new tires. The tires used in both qualifying segments must be used in the race, and all qualifying
tires are considered part of each team’s event tire allocation.

"Including multiple drivers in qualifying for our Pro-Am classes provides some unique opportunities," Doonan said. "The Am drivers
will continue to play the ultimate role of establishing each car’s starting position, while the Pro drivers should contribute to further
showcasing each car’s performance."

The DPi and GTLM qualifying structure continues as it was in 2020, with each car being qualified by a single driver and also earning
championship points.
SERIES CHANGES FOR 2021
A Le Mans-style start was used for many years in various
types of motor racing.

When the start flag dropped, drivers had to run across the
track to their cars which were parked on the other side,
climb in, start the car, and drive away to begin the race.

Such starts were very unsafe, with drivers possibly rushing
the process of fastening their safety equipment.

At Le Mans in 1969, Jacky Ickx, who always considered
this type of start to be dangerous, decided to walk to his
car instead of running. Taking the time to secure every
thing made him effectively start in the last position but
nevertheless, he went on to win the race.

This staged protest, and the death of John Woolfe in the
first lap, at the Maison Blanche curve, precisely because
he didn't fasten his seat belt, led to the running start be
abolished the following year.
Fun Fact - Le Mans-style Starts
Instead of the cars forming up on the grid before a race, they
were positioned one behind the other on the side of the start /
finish straight closest to the pits, at a slight angle known as
“ear of corn” or in “echelon” style.

At the start, the cars accelerated away one by one, beginning
a formation lap and bunching up before the race begins in
earnest.
12 Hours of Sebring - 1969